State Treasure - New Jersey

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 39 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Dubel TreasureBURLINGTON COUNTY – Furman Dubel was a shrewd businessman from Burlington who made quite a lot of money from his various investments. He lived a frugal lifestyle in part due to his being a recluse. In 1905 he died at his home where family members found gold and silver coins and currency that had been hidden throughout his home. Dubel’s estate was worth $500,000. The family could account for $300,000, but the remaining $200,000 was never found. Not one to trust banks, Dubel had kept his money cached at an unknown location, but searches for it by family members failed to locate any of it.



A Miner's Reward

By Bruce Hewkin
From page 42 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Ebb left his recliner and returned with a fresh cup of coffee. "How’s it going up at the mine?" he asked before lighting up a cigarette."Not too bad, Ebb. That placer cut I talked of the other day. Well, about 120 cubic yards of earth from it sloughed off into the raceway. Now that it’s pouring rain today, I’ll just let that slough ground sluice. Then tomorrow I’ll begin mucking out gravel and rock that hasn’t washed through with the tailing fork.""Not a bad idea," replied Ebb. "Let the water work for you." He thought for a moment. "Speaking of placer mining, are you familiar with the old Steinmetz Placer above Halfway?""No, I’m not, Ebb.



Tools of the Trade - Fallen Treasure

By Chris Gholson
From page 44 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


I had been so sure that this target was going to be gold. The low, mellow signal it had triggered on my metal detector was exactly what I had been listening for. This corner of northwestern Arizona had rewarded me with many nice nuggets that winter, and most of those had sounded nearly identical. The signal alone had me feeling good, but when I hit the five-inch mark and broke into a layer of highly oxidized red soil my confidence doubled. If all went as expected I would be celebrating that evening around the campfire. When my excavation was finished I should have been greeted by the distinctive glitter of freshly dug gold, yet here I was staring down at some worthless rock. My heart sank.



The Three Keys to Historical Treasure

By Ricky Don McIntosh
From page 48 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Dreams of silver, gold, and anything old drives me to a magic realm where fantasy turns to reality and my metal detector makes it so. The magic realm hides the pre existence of old vanished towns with houses, stores, churches, schools, swimming holes, race tracks, Civil War sites, and so on. Over the years, I have learned that treasures of silver and gold only play a very small part of the wealth on these sites. The mother lode of wealth comes one piece at a time in the form of historical treasures. After I learned the three keys that unlocked the magic realm, I found never-ending treasure all through my life. The truth of the matter, the world today seems to pay little attention to the forgotten past of many, many years ago.



State Treasure - New Mexico

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 50 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


'Schat-Chen' and theMcCarty’s Station MysteryCIBOLA COUNTY – To clarify any questions of the location of Laguna Pueblo, Acoma Pueblo, and McCarty’s Station, all accounts of this story place these three sites in Valencia County. However, on June 19, 1981, Cibola County was created from the westernmost land of Valencia County. Today all three sites are in Cibola County. The account of the Lost Acoma Silver Strike located in New Mexico’s Laguna Indian country, according to Xanthus Carson in 1968, "never developed farther than a remarkably vivid account of the discovery," which appears in a rare volume of early history written by American civil engineer John M. Gunn about the Laguna and Acoma tribes.



Worthless or Not?

By Jerry Eckhart
From page 53 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Several times a year I set up displays of my found treasures, either for treasure clubs or sports shows. When I first began, I concentrated on all the coins I had found, but for the past several years I changed them. It seems the small, unidentified or unusual items garner more interest. Older ladies marvel over worn compact cases that remind them of earlier days. Men express interest over tax tokens, badges, or overall buttons.Quite possibly these everyday items evoke memories of earlier days when their lives were simpler. The average American, man or woman, grew up with certain items that were valuable to them and the sight of those items reminds them of what once was valuable in their life. I am often asked if a particular item is valuable.



LTI Publications Bid Loving Farewell to Former Office Manager

By Carla Banning
From page 7 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Isa I. Harris, resident of Grove, Oklahoma, and mother of Lost Treasure Magazine Publisher Lee Harris, and Lost Treasure Ancillary Publishing Representative Lawrence Harris, passed away recently at the age of 91.



Questions & Answers

By Jimmy Dion
From page 56 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


I need help with this hoard maybe of Tom Tew or his men. From what I learned about Bermuda {SI}, a certain Thomas Tew was there in 1692 looking for income, but was greedy and caught a cannonball in the brisket in 1695. His men buried him near Newport, his residence. He also had very pretty large rocks.Jeweler says it is not sterling, as it is light, yet rings found nearby have 925 and I CK inside and a pig and boat logo, too! These are all nugget form and in great number…all consistent with mentioned logo. I think it has something to do with Sommer Islands (Bermuda) - same color as old dimes or pieces of 8. Could it be pure silver from the 17th century? Appears on beach at low tides and (after) northeasters.



The Lost Gold Placers of Cibola

By Jane Alene Boyles
From page 8 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


We have all heard of the seven lost cities of gold called Cibola. Well, I have found another lost "city" of Cibola right in our own backyard. Cibola, Arizona, is an interesting little community on Baseline Road near the Colorado River, built in the 1990’s. Baseline technically runs across Arizona because it is the Baseline Meridian used when surveying the state some time ago. When you look the town over it is obvious that none of it has been in existence very long. I happen to possess an old treasure map of all the known gold placers in Arizona each marked with an X. When analyzing this treasure map, it appeared to me that the community of Cibola is in a different place on the map then where it actually exists.



Maryland's Lost Silver Mine

By James Rada, Jr.
From page 61 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


For more than a century, rumors have persisted in Carroll County, Maryland, of a lost treasure. Most versions of the story say it is a hidden silver mine, but at least one version of the story says that the treasure is gold bullion stored in a cave.Either way, the treasure has eluded hunters, leaving residents split over whether it ever existed. Ahrwud’s MineThe story of a silver mine in the Silver Run area of Carroll County supposedly dates back to the late 1750’s when a German silversmith with the last name of Ahrwud settled in the area.



The Submarine Man

By John Christopher Fine
From page 11 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


It was in the dark of night that the Confederate States Submarine H. L. Hunley left Charleston Harbor on February 17, 1864. Union ships blockaded the southern port so completely that the largely agricultural South was being choked to death. The Civil War still dragged on, but the death knell blow was dealt when General Robert E. Lee ordered Pickett’s Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg."You have to understand that the North had unlimited supplies, resources and men. For every Union soldier killed or wounded in combat during the Civil War, two more could be equipped and sent into battle. The South could not replace their soldiers.



Real Pirates

By John Minges
From page 63 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The story of the ship "Whydah," pronounced wih-dah, began in 1715 in London as a heavily armed transport vessel that carried merchandise from England for exchange of slaves in Africa. This ship measured approximately 105 feet in length and could travel speeds of over 14 miles per hour. It was considered quite remarkable in its time. Furthermore, the ship carried a standard compliment of 18 six-pound cannons, but in times of trouble an additional 10 cannons could be added.In February of 1717, the captain of the Whydah, Lawrence Prince, was sailing the Windward Passage near Cuba and Hispaniola. He quickly found himself involved in a chase from two other ships under the command of pirate "Black Sam" Bellamy.



The Story of One Man's Search For His Gun...And One Man's Story In Finding It

By Randy Roberts
From page 17 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


This story is all about, as a treasurer hunter, not forgetting about some of the old sites you once knew about.
If you think you have scoured everything there might be to find there, think again!
You just might find yourself stumbling across a piece of history and getting more out of it than just the excitement of discovery.
About 20 years earlier, on a rainy early summer day, my brother and I were told about a very old cabin site very close to his house.
We decided to go and see if we could find it. After looking around for a while, for this old cabin, we eventually found it.
In anticipation of discovery we quickly got into search mode.
We started out with finding a few horseshoes and other odds and ends, such as lids to fruit jars and square nails.



Money Talk - So-Called Dollars

By Frank Colletti
From page 20 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In 1963, a new study of medals of historical significance was published to little fanfare.
The reference called simply “So-Called Dollars,” by Harold E. Hibbler and Charles V. Kappen, was to launch a study of medals that was at least 1-15/16” to a maximum of 1-3/4”.
The other major requirements for listing were that they were only United States issues, no purely presidential or political medals, no school or athletic medals, nor calendar or store cards, with a few other minor requirements.
The reference to the medal in the book is usually abbreviated as HK-#, for Hibbler-Kappens, and the number as listed in the book.



Juneau's Mining Legacy Is Everywhere

By Roy Stevenson
From page 24 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Alaska! When we hear that name images come to mind of hard-bitten miners with scraggly beards panning for gold in turbulent, frigid rivers. Young men with carbide lamps on their helmets, drilling and blasting inside underground mines.
And these images indeed capture the gold miner’s hardscrabble life in Alaska when it was the epicenter of the U.S.’s gold mining industry from the late 1800’s to 1944.
I recently visited Juneau, in southeast Alaska, to see its gold mining history for myself.
Tourism operators have realized the importance of resurrecting Juneau’s gold mining history and have, guided by historians, opened some outstanding tours and museums that bring Alaska’s gold mining legacy back to life.



State Treasure - Maryland

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 28 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Johnson Gang Loot
CECIL COUNTY – Bruce Alfred Johnson (March 27, 1939 – August 8, 2002) was the leader of the notorious Johnson gang who, from 1960 until their arrest in 1978, operated a major car theft, burglary and fencing operation that netted them millions from their victims living in northeastern Maryland, Delaware, and southeastern Pennsylvania.
Brothers Norman and David Johnson were lieutenants who helped run the gang, which, in its heyday, employed 40 adults and teens.
The Johnson brothers began their life-long career in crime from the high mountain region in Tennessee.
They relocated to Chester County, Pennsylvania, near the Maryland and Delaware state lines in 1960 where they established their new headquarters.



Lady Gold Diver - Margaret Weller, Dean of Treasure Divers

By John Christopher Fine
From page 32 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


She got the moniker after her discovery of a perfect four Escudo gold coin on the Nieves shipwreck site.
Her husband was called Frogfoot from his days in the US Navy, Commander of Underwater Demolition Team One in Korea.
It was a given that sooner or later Margaret would earn a nickname in the world of underwater treasure salvors.
Her nickname stuck, as did legends that surrounded this happy couple that shared their adventure with others.
Born in Pointe a Pierre, Trinidad, in 1939, Margaret Matthews’ father worked for an oil holding company on the island before the war.



A Treasure Island, Spanish Forts & Gold Beneath the Waves

By Lost Treasure Staff & Special Guest Reviewers
From page 36 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Treasure Island
The Untold Story
By John Amrhein, Jr.
Reviewed by John Christopher Fine
John Amrhein, Jr. lives in the Outer Banks of North Carolina where he works as a real estate broker. His first book about the 1750 Spanish fleet was titled “The Hidden Galleon: The True Story of a Lost Spanish Ship and the Wild Ponies of Assateague Island.”
The meticulous research and quest over many years saw Amrhein find La Galga. The shipwreck was not under water, as official mantra put it, rather under National Park Service land where it has been put off limits to further discovery.



State Treasure - Massachusetts

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 40 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Mohegan Indian
Treasure Legend
BERKSHIRE COUNTY – There is an old Mohegan Indian treasure legend dating to the 1600’s during a time when the Indians made frequent raids on Colonial settlements.
Having no use of the white man’s money, jewelry or other valuables, the legend claims the Mohegan raiders buried the accumulation of valuables looted from the whites in the area of Bish-Bash Falls near the community of Mt. Washington.



Lost Treasure Metal Detector Field Test & Review - The Garrett AT Gold

By Chris Gholson
From page 44 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


As I crested the top of the ridge and looked into the creek below, I was delighted to see I had plenty of new ground to work with the AT Gold. Just as I had hoped, there were fresh diggings and newly exposed bedrock just waiting to be detected.
Every weekend, like clockwork, a group of gold prospectors from Phoenix, Arizona, would visit this dry creek and spend hours shoveling the gold-bearing gravels into their dry-washers.
For those not familiar with a dry-washer, it is an ingenious device used to separate particles of gold from dirt by using bursts of air and electrostatic attraction. They work exceptionally well in arid regions and are usually the preferred piece of mining equipment for desert prospectors.