Finding Laffite's Fortune: The Beale Treasure

By A. Nonymous
From page 15 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Jean Laffite was not only a gentleman pirate/privateer, but also a man consumed with numbers. Whether involving code names, active gambling, figuring navigation, or just an inventory of his booty, Lafitte used numbers as an integral part of his daily life. He was intrigued by figures and how they could relate to his many life plans. To solve the riddle that leads to his reputed buried fortune, one must consider key segments of Lafitte’s life, and the numbers produced by each. Then, one must put these numbers together in a planned sequence within a giant puzzle known today as the "Beale Ciphers" or "Beale Papers." Beale is reportedly a pseudonym for the gentleman pirate Lafitte.



The Treasure of Richmond (Rich Man's) Island

By Henry E. Metivier
From page 19 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


This little island off Cape Elizabeth, Maine, is easily reached by walking over Crescent Beach to the south and across the breakwater that connects the island to the mainland.Nobody lives there now; it is a wildlife refuge and has deer, woodchuck, and many other wild creatures.In the early part of the 17th century, it is said there was a church, several families, and houses on the island. The inhabitants of this period were employed in farming and shipbuilding.One of the earliest inhabitants, a man named Walt Bagnall, or Great Walt as he was called, was a shrewd businessman. That’s putting it mildly.What he really did was to trade almost worthless beads and trinkets to the Indians for valuable furs.



Joseph Criner Family Treasures Found

By William Walker
From page 21 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In 1804, a 37-year-old explorer named Joseph C. Criner (1769-1843) and his younger brother,Issac, accompanied by Stephen McBroom, came down from Tennessee to explore what is now called Madison County, Alabama. Aided by friendly Indians, the men were led to a clear fresh water spring, called Big Spring, now occupying the center of Huntsville.A rare find was recently made of two lost Criner family treasures. Included in some of the articles removed from trunks stored in the old Capt. Elijah F. Walker house, on Gate Street in Gurley, was an old family Bible bound in leather and printed in 1824. As of 2010, this Bible is 186-years-old. It was discovered that this was the Joseph Criner family Bible owned by Joseph and his wife, Eleanor Ingram Criner.



How To 'Pimp Your Detector' For the Red, White & Blue

By Gary Gross
From page 23 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


For over 25 years, I’ve been chasing bad guys and seizing evidence as a Sergeant with the Lakeland Police Department. I consider myself an all American type guy that loves apple pie à la mode and I wear an American flag patch on my ballistic vest. My Ford truck is blue and my bass boat is red and, on the side of my boat, I proudly display a flaming eagle. All of these are a constant reminder to me of the men and women who serve in the military and make the ultimate sacrifice for our country. With a newfound hobby of metal detecting, I now take every opportunity to chase coins and seize relics of the past. It’s the sense of adventure and discovery for me and it’s no different than investigating a crime and trying to figure out whodunit.



State Treasure - Michigan

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 27 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Silver Jack’s Lost Gold & Silver MineMARQUETTE COUNTY – "Silver Jack" Driscoll was a lumberjack, part-time prospector, and part-time brawler. Driscoll left his home in Seney to follow the timber west in 1883, and in time he settled in L’ Anse. During his travels between Seney and L’ Anse, Driscoll drove logs on the Yellow Dog River north of Ishpeming. During his days driving logs he discovered his legendary gold and silver mine.After settling in L’ Anse, Driscoll would take off on foot periodically towards the Huron Mountains north of the Yellow Dog River. Weeks later he’d reappear in L’ Anse with his packs full of gold and silver nuggets.



Civic Patrol

By Celine Buffett
From page 32 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


On July 12, a young man came to my home and told me he or his girlfriend had lost a $600+ engagement ring in an un-mowed hay field behind his home and asked if he could borrow my metal detector.I said, "No," because I use it too much (I’m retired), "but I’d be glad to look for it tomorrow evening." The next evening I drove to his home and saw a 10 x 10 foot area that had been run over by a lawn mower where he thought the ring was lost. I said to myself, "This can be good or bad…hope he didn’t hit the ring." I got out my trusty Quicksilver and started looking. After about 30 minutes I got a good hit. Brushing back the cut grass I saw that yellow shine everyone hopes for.



Treasure News - Bert Kilbride, Last Pirate of the Caribbean

By John Christopher Fine
From page 36 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Treasure Trove is a little pub on a corner of Southeast 5th Street in Ft. Lauderdale Beach, Florida. The bar was started by a treasure diver that attended a shipwreck symposium begun by Marine Geologist Bill Raymond in Ft. Lauderdale in 1984. Just out of college, Ed Stevens met Mel Fisher, Bert Kilbride, and other speakers at the symposium.The young man began diving with Bert Kilbride on a project to locate a fabled Spanish galleon that sank in the British Virgin Islands. The galleon was never found, but plenty of others were located off a 13-mile long reef that extends from the Island of Anegada between the Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea. It is a treacherous passage even today with modern navigational aids.



State Treasure - New Jersey

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 39 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Dubel TreasureBURLINGTON COUNTY – Furman Dubel was a shrewd businessman from Burlington who made quite a lot of money from his various investments. He lived a frugal lifestyle in part due to his being a recluse. In 1905 he died at his home where family members found gold and silver coins and currency that had been hidden throughout his home. Dubel’s estate was worth $500,000. The family could account for $300,000, but the remaining $200,000 was never found. Not one to trust banks, Dubel had kept his money cached at an unknown location, but searches for it by family members failed to locate any of it.



A Miner's Reward

By Bruce Hewkin
From page 42 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Ebb left his recliner and returned with a fresh cup of coffee. "How’s it going up at the mine?" he asked before lighting up a cigarette."Not too bad, Ebb. That placer cut I talked of the other day. Well, about 120 cubic yards of earth from it sloughed off into the raceway. Now that it’s pouring rain today, I’ll just let that slough ground sluice. Then tomorrow I’ll begin mucking out gravel and rock that hasn’t washed through with the tailing fork.""Not a bad idea," replied Ebb. "Let the water work for you." He thought for a moment. "Speaking of placer mining, are you familiar with the old Steinmetz Placer above Halfway?""No, I’m not, Ebb.



Tools of the Trade - Fallen Treasure

By Chris Gholson
From page 44 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


I had been so sure that this target was going to be gold. The low, mellow signal it had triggered on my metal detector was exactly what I had been listening for. This corner of northwestern Arizona had rewarded me with many nice nuggets that winter, and most of those had sounded nearly identical. The signal alone had me feeling good, but when I hit the five-inch mark and broke into a layer of highly oxidized red soil my confidence doubled. If all went as expected I would be celebrating that evening around the campfire. When my excavation was finished I should have been greeted by the distinctive glitter of freshly dug gold, yet here I was staring down at some worthless rock. My heart sank.



The Three Keys to Historical Treasure

By Ricky Don McIntosh
From page 48 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Dreams of silver, gold, and anything old drives me to a magic realm where fantasy turns to reality and my metal detector makes it so. The magic realm hides the pre existence of old vanished towns with houses, stores, churches, schools, swimming holes, race tracks, Civil War sites, and so on. Over the years, I have learned that treasures of silver and gold only play a very small part of the wealth on these sites. The mother lode of wealth comes one piece at a time in the form of historical treasures. After I learned the three keys that unlocked the magic realm, I found never-ending treasure all through my life. The truth of the matter, the world today seems to pay little attention to the forgotten past of many, many years ago.



State Treasure - New Mexico

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 50 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


'Schat-Chen' and theMcCarty’s Station MysteryCIBOLA COUNTY – To clarify any questions of the location of Laguna Pueblo, Acoma Pueblo, and McCarty’s Station, all accounts of this story place these three sites in Valencia County. However, on June 19, 1981, Cibola County was created from the westernmost land of Valencia County. Today all three sites are in Cibola County. The account of the Lost Acoma Silver Strike located in New Mexico’s Laguna Indian country, according to Xanthus Carson in 1968, "never developed farther than a remarkably vivid account of the discovery," which appears in a rare volume of early history written by American civil engineer John M. Gunn about the Laguna and Acoma tribes.



Tom's Baby

By John Minges
From page 64 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The mystery of discovery often takes many twists and turns.
The truth is not always self-evident, especially when it comes to things of great value.
As tales are told and handed down from generation to generation, you have to imagine that at some point there is a little embellishment and some out right lies that are told.
In Colorado in 1859, a small mining town was formed just south of the area known as South Park, which stands at the elevation of 10,000 feet in the Rocky Mountains of central Colorado.
This area quickly became known for the extensive placer gold deposits due west of South Park.
A town sprang up and the founders decided to call it Breckinridge after the 14th Vice President of the United States.



Treasure Is Beyond the Frontier

By Tom Stallard
From page 8 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Treasure tales seem to follow the frontier west in the new world. And four tales seem to be at the heart of the exploration of America.
First came the Spanish hunt for Eldorado, a lost city of gold that was always a little further on across the next mountain ridge or up the next river, which led the Spanish to explore much of Mexico, South America, and what is now the United States.
When the French explored the Mississippi Valley they were looking for silver, gold, furs, and a route to get it home.
The English, as they moved west, were spurred on by the quest for the source of the silver that the Indians seemed to have in abundance.
The legend of Swift’s silver mines had the same effect as the legend of Eldorado.



How To: Disasters Can Mean Treasure

By Jerry Eckhart
From page 11 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


No matter where you live, disaster can strike in an instant. It has happened to me.
When it does, the victims are stunned, shocked, and numb to everyday feelings.
They are faced with loss of property, friends, and maybe even loved ones.
Disasters may range from flood or a fire, to a car wreck or storm. When it is over, most people breathe a sigh of relief and whisper, “Thank God it’s over. All that matters is that we are alive.”
Unfortunately, as that numbness wears off people realize just how much they have lost.
Some simply give up and move on. Others, with an American spirit of resilience and inborn toughness, pick up the pieces and begin to rebuild. It has happened a lot in my part of the world, once even to me.



V3 Recovery

By Gerry Edwards
From page 15 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


It had been almost a year since I sat down at my computer and put one of my adventures to ink.
Thirteen years ago a severe automobile accident had put me on the path to a career of gold grubbing and treasure recovery.
I had used White’s metal detectors as a form of therapy and, after many surgeries, had recuperated very well. Now I had suffered a setback.
Between the winter rains and
what they thought was a stroke, I was back at it again.
Turned out to be a massive infection that had hit my inner ear and I could not even walk.
Two weeks in a hospital and in bed for a month was all I could tolerate.
I decided that metal detecting would be good therapy and exercise.



The Story of One Man's Search For His Gun...And One Man's Story In Finding It

By Randy Roberts
From page 17 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


This story is all about, as a treasurer hunter, not forgetting about some of the old sites you once knew about.
If you think you have scoured everything there might be to find there, think again!
You just might find yourself stumbling across a piece of history and getting more out of it than just the excitement of discovery.
About 20 years earlier, on a rainy early summer day, my brother and I were told about a very old cabin site very close to his house.
We decided to go and see if we could find it. After looking around for a while, for this old cabin, we eventually found it.
In anticipation of discovery we quickly got into search mode.
We started out with finding a few horseshoes and other odds and ends, such as lids to fruit jars and square nails.



Money Talk - So-Called Dollars

By Frank Colletti
From page 20 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In 1963, a new study of medals of historical significance was published to little fanfare.
The reference called simply “So-Called Dollars,” by Harold E. Hibbler and Charles V. Kappen, was to launch a study of medals that was at least 1-15/16” to a maximum of 1-3/4”.
The other major requirements for listing were that they were only United States issues, no purely presidential or political medals, no school or athletic medals, nor calendar or store cards, with a few other minor requirements.
The reference to the medal in the book is usually abbreviated as HK-#, for Hibbler-Kappens, and the number as listed in the book.



Juneau's Mining Legacy Is Everywhere

By Roy Stevenson
From page 24 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Alaska! When we hear that name images come to mind of hard-bitten miners with scraggly beards panning for gold in turbulent, frigid rivers. Young men with carbide lamps on their helmets, drilling and blasting inside underground mines.
And these images indeed capture the gold miner’s hardscrabble life in Alaska when it was the epicenter of the U.S.’s gold mining industry from the late 1800’s to 1944.
I recently visited Juneau, in southeast Alaska, to see its gold mining history for myself.
Tourism operators have realized the importance of resurrecting Juneau’s gold mining history and have, guided by historians, opened some outstanding tours and museums that bring Alaska’s gold mining legacy back to life.



State Treasure - Maryland

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 28 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Johnson Gang Loot
CECIL COUNTY – Bruce Alfred Johnson (March 27, 1939 – August 8, 2002) was the leader of the notorious Johnson gang who, from 1960 until their arrest in 1978, operated a major car theft, burglary and fencing operation that netted them millions from their victims living in northeastern Maryland, Delaware, and southeastern Pennsylvania.
Brothers Norman and David Johnson were lieutenants who helped run the gang, which, in its heyday, employed 40 adults and teens.
The Johnson brothers began their life-long career in crime from the high mountain region in Tennessee.
They relocated to Chester County, Pennsylvania, near the Maryland and Delaware state lines in 1960 where they established their new headquarters.