The Three Keys to Historical Treasure

By Ricky Don McIntosh
From page 48 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Dreams of silver, gold, and anything old drives me to a magic realm where fantasy turns to reality and my metal detector makes it so. The magic realm hides the pre existence of old vanished towns with houses, stores, churches, schools, swimming holes, race tracks, Civil War sites, and so on. Over the years, I have learned that treasures of silver and gold only play a very small part of the wealth on these sites. The mother lode of wealth comes one piece at a time in the form of historical treasures. After I learned the three keys that unlocked the magic realm, I found never-ending treasure all through my life. The truth of the matter, the world today seems to pay little attention to the forgotten past of many, many years ago.



State Treasure - New Mexico

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 50 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


'Schat-Chen' and theMcCarty’s Station MysteryCIBOLA COUNTY – To clarify any questions of the location of Laguna Pueblo, Acoma Pueblo, and McCarty’s Station, all accounts of this story place these three sites in Valencia County. However, on June 19, 1981, Cibola County was created from the westernmost land of Valencia County. Today all three sites are in Cibola County. The account of the Lost Acoma Silver Strike located in New Mexico’s Laguna Indian country, according to Xanthus Carson in 1968, "never developed farther than a remarkably vivid account of the discovery," which appears in a rare volume of early history written by American civil engineer John M. Gunn about the Laguna and Acoma tribes.



Worthless or Not?

By Jerry Eckhart
From page 53 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Several times a year I set up displays of my found treasures, either for treasure clubs or sports shows. When I first began, I concentrated on all the coins I had found, but for the past several years I changed them. It seems the small, unidentified or unusual items garner more interest. Older ladies marvel over worn compact cases that remind them of earlier days. Men express interest over tax tokens, badges, or overall buttons.Quite possibly these everyday items evoke memories of earlier days when their lives were simpler. The average American, man or woman, grew up with certain items that were valuable to them and the sight of those items reminds them of what once was valuable in their life. I am often asked if a particular item is valuable.



LTI Publications Bid Loving Farewell to Former Office Manager

By Carla Banning
From page 7 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Isa I. Harris, resident of Grove, Oklahoma, and mother of Lost Treasure Magazine Publisher Lee Harris, and Lost Treasure Ancillary Publishing Representative Lawrence Harris, passed away recently at the age of 91.



Questions & Answers

By Jimmy Dion
From page 56 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


I need help with this hoard maybe of Tom Tew or his men. From what I learned about Bermuda {SI}, a certain Thomas Tew was there in 1692 looking for income, but was greedy and caught a cannonball in the brisket in 1695. His men buried him near Newport, his residence. He also had very pretty large rocks.Jeweler says it is not sterling, as it is light, yet rings found nearby have 925 and I CK inside and a pig and boat logo, too! These are all nugget form and in great number…all consistent with mentioned logo. I think it has something to do with Sommer Islands (Bermuda) - same color as old dimes or pieces of 8. Could it be pure silver from the 17th century? Appears on beach at low tides and (after) northeasters.



The Lost Gold Placers of Cibola

By Jane Alene Boyles
From page 8 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


We have all heard of the seven lost cities of gold called Cibola. Well, I have found another lost "city" of Cibola right in our own backyard. Cibola, Arizona, is an interesting little community on Baseline Road near the Colorado River, built in the 1990’s. Baseline technically runs across Arizona because it is the Baseline Meridian used when surveying the state some time ago. When you look the town over it is obvious that none of it has been in existence very long. I happen to possess an old treasure map of all the known gold placers in Arizona each marked with an X. When analyzing this treasure map, it appeared to me that the community of Cibola is in a different place on the map then where it actually exists.



Maryland's Lost Silver Mine

By James Rada, Jr.
From page 61 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


For more than a century, rumors have persisted in Carroll County, Maryland, of a lost treasure. Most versions of the story say it is a hidden silver mine, but at least one version of the story says that the treasure is gold bullion stored in a cave.Either way, the treasure has eluded hunters, leaving residents split over whether it ever existed. Ahrwud’s MineThe story of a silver mine in the Silver Run area of Carroll County supposedly dates back to the late 1750’s when a German silversmith with the last name of Ahrwud settled in the area.



The Submarine Man

By John Christopher Fine
From page 11 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


It was in the dark of night that the Confederate States Submarine H. L. Hunley left Charleston Harbor on February 17, 1864. Union ships blockaded the southern port so completely that the largely agricultural South was being choked to death. The Civil War still dragged on, but the death knell blow was dealt when General Robert E. Lee ordered Pickett’s Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg."You have to understand that the North had unlimited supplies, resources and men. For every Union soldier killed or wounded in combat during the Civil War, two more could be equipped and sent into battle. The South could not replace their soldiers.



Real Pirates

By John Minges
From page 63 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The story of the ship "Whydah," pronounced wih-dah, began in 1715 in London as a heavily armed transport vessel that carried merchandise from England for exchange of slaves in Africa. This ship measured approximately 105 feet in length and could travel speeds of over 14 miles per hour. It was considered quite remarkable in its time. Furthermore, the ship carried a standard compliment of 18 six-pound cannons, but in times of trouble an additional 10 cannons could be added.In February of 1717, the captain of the Whydah, Lawrence Prince, was sailing the Windward Passage near Cuba and Hispaniola. He quickly found himself involved in a chase from two other ships under the command of pirate "Black Sam" Bellamy.



Finding Laffite's Fortune: The Beale Treasure

By A. Nonymous
From page 15 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Jean Laffite was not only a gentleman pirate/privateer, but also a man consumed with numbers. Whether involving code names, active gambling, figuring navigation, or just an inventory of his booty, Lafitte used numbers as an integral part of his daily life. He was intrigued by figures and how they could relate to his many life plans. To solve the riddle that leads to his reputed buried fortune, one must consider key segments of Lafitte’s life, and the numbers produced by each. Then, one must put these numbers together in a planned sequence within a giant puzzle known today as the "Beale Ciphers" or "Beale Papers." Beale is reportedly a pseudonym for the gentleman pirate Lafitte.



The Treasure of Richmond (Rich Man's) Island

By Henry E. Metivier
From page 19 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


This little island off Cape Elizabeth, Maine, is easily reached by walking over Crescent Beach to the south and across the breakwater that connects the island to the mainland.Nobody lives there now; it is a wildlife refuge and has deer, woodchuck, and many other wild creatures.In the early part of the 17th century, it is said there was a church, several families, and houses on the island. The inhabitants of this period were employed in farming and shipbuilding.One of the earliest inhabitants, a man named Walt Bagnall, or Great Walt as he was called, was a shrewd businessman. That’s putting it mildly.What he really did was to trade almost worthless beads and trinkets to the Indians for valuable furs.



Joseph Criner Family Treasures Found

By William Walker
From page 21 of the July, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In 1804, a 37-year-old explorer named Joseph C. Criner (1769-1843) and his younger brother,Issac, accompanied by Stephen McBroom, came down from Tennessee to explore what is now called Madison County, Alabama. Aided by friendly Indians, the men were led to a clear fresh water spring, called Big Spring, now occupying the center of Huntsville.A rare find was recently made of two lost Criner family treasures. Included in some of the articles removed from trunks stored in the old Capt. Elijah F. Walker house, on Gate Street in Gurley, was an old family Bible bound in leather and printed in 1824. As of 2010, this Bible is 186-years-old. It was discovered that this was the Joseph Criner family Bible owned by Joseph and his wife, Eleanor Ingram Criner.



State Treasure - Maryland

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 28 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


The Johnson Gang Loot
CECIL COUNTY – Bruce Alfred Johnson (March 27, 1939 – August 8, 2002) was the leader of the notorious Johnson gang who, from 1960 until their arrest in 1978, operated a major car theft, burglary and fencing operation that netted them millions from their victims living in northeastern Maryland, Delaware, and southeastern Pennsylvania.
Brothers Norman and David Johnson were lieutenants who helped run the gang, which, in its heyday, employed 40 adults and teens.
The Johnson brothers began their life-long career in crime from the high mountain region in Tennessee.
They relocated to Chester County, Pennsylvania, near the Maryland and Delaware state lines in 1960 where they established their new headquarters.



Lady Gold Diver - Margaret Weller, Dean of Treasure Divers

By John Christopher Fine
From page 32 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


She got the moniker after her discovery of a perfect four Escudo gold coin on the Nieves shipwreck site.
Her husband was called Frogfoot from his days in the US Navy, Commander of Underwater Demolition Team One in Korea.
It was a given that sooner or later Margaret would earn a nickname in the world of underwater treasure salvors.
Her nickname stuck, as did legends that surrounded this happy couple that shared their adventure with others.
Born in Pointe a Pierre, Trinidad, in 1939, Margaret Matthews’ father worked for an oil holding company on the island before the war.



A Treasure Island, Spanish Forts & Gold Beneath the Waves

By Lost Treasure Staff & Special Guest Reviewers
From page 36 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Treasure Island
The Untold Story
By John Amrhein, Jr.
Reviewed by John Christopher Fine
John Amrhein, Jr. lives in the Outer Banks of North Carolina where he works as a real estate broker. His first book about the 1750 Spanish fleet was titled “The Hidden Galleon: The True Story of a Lost Spanish Ship and the Wild Ponies of Assateague Island.”
The meticulous research and quest over many years saw Amrhein find La Galga. The shipwreck was not under water, as official mantra put it, rather under National Park Service land where it has been put off limits to further discovery.



State Treasure - Massachusetts

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 40 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Mohegan Indian
Treasure Legend
BERKSHIRE COUNTY – There is an old Mohegan Indian treasure legend dating to the 1600’s during a time when the Indians made frequent raids on Colonial settlements.
Having no use of the white man’s money, jewelry or other valuables, the legend claims the Mohegan raiders buried the accumulation of valuables looted from the whites in the area of Bish-Bash Falls near the community of Mt. Washington.



Lost Treasure Metal Detector Field Test & Review - The Garrett AT Gold

By Chris Gholson
From page 44 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


As I crested the top of the ridge and looked into the creek below, I was delighted to see I had plenty of new ground to work with the AT Gold. Just as I had hoped, there were fresh diggings and newly exposed bedrock just waiting to be detected.
Every weekend, like clockwork, a group of gold prospectors from Phoenix, Arizona, would visit this dry creek and spend hours shoveling the gold-bearing gravels into their dry-washers.
For those not familiar with a dry-washer, it is an ingenious device used to separate particles of gold from dirt by using bursts of air and electrostatic attraction. They work exceptionally well in arid regions and are usually the preferred piece of mining equipment for desert prospectors.



Tools of the Trade - Uncovering Valuables From West Coast Beaches

By Andy Sabisch
From page 48 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


In late 2011, one of my columns was entitled “Finding Coins and Other Valuables in Heavily Hunted Sites” and featured input from Bryce Brown, one of the most successful hunters out there when it comes to recovering the last remaining valuables from sites that are trash-filled and have been written off by virtually every hunter within 100 miles.
He shared some of his secrets and, based on the feedback I have received, as well as what’s been posted on some of the Internet’s forums, it was well received and has helped others start to make similar recoveries in their area.



State Treasure - New York

By Anthony M. Belli
From page 52 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


Southampton’s Ghost Ship
SUFFOLK COUNTY – Residents of the small agricultural fishing village of Southampton awoke on October 31, 1816, and observed a Spanish brig lolling in the surf west of town.
Locals could see the vessel was adrift and didn’t appear to have a crew.
There had been a large Atlantic storm the previous day so it was believed the storm might have been responsible.
The first people to board the ghost ship reported it was deserted. They found no name on the ship and no cargo or papers that could help identify her.
Onboard, the searchers found furniture, food, clothing, and personal belongings scattered throughout.



Diving Into Treasure

By Matt Blackburn
From page 56 of the June, 2012 issue of Lost Treasure
Copyright © 2012 Lost Treasure, Inc. all rights reserved


As warmer weather approaches most of us begin planning our next outdoor adventure.
If you are like most people you tend to forget that metal detecting is not just a land-based sport.
Granted, most metal detectors have search coils that are submersible, which makes it possible to search on sandy beaches or even in shallow water locations.
However, there are over a dozen different detectors made by a range of companies that are fully submersible, with some going to depths over 100 feet!
This is great news for at least a million people in the United States where the sense of adventure does not end at the water’s edge, but just begins by way of snorkeling and diving.